ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM
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Title Comparison Of Products Used For Intracoronal Bleaching
Clinical Question In a patient with a nonvital tooth, will internal tooth bleaching using sodium perborate and 37% carbamide peroxide paste produce as effective whitening in the same length of time as sodium perborate and distilled water?
Clinical Bottom Line In a patient with a non-vital tooth, intracoronal bleaching with sodium perborate and 37% carbamide peroxide paste produces the same shade of white in the same length of time as sodium perborate and distilled water. (See Comments on the CAT below)
Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link)
PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type
(level of evidence)
#1) 19071038de Souza-Zaroni/200930 patients desiring intracoronal bleachingRandomized Controlled Trial
Key resultsIn the group bleached with sodium perborate and 37% carbamide peroxide paste, the pre-treatment mean color position was 15.07 and post treatment mean color position was 9.27. The group treated with sodium perborate and distilled water had a pre-treatment mean color position of 15.13 and post treatment mean color position of 9.67. The Wilcoxon paired signed rank test verified that both groups presented significant difference in pre and post-treatment color (P = .007 for both groups). The Mann-Whitney test showed that there was no significant difference between the two groups when comparing the change in color position (P =1).
Evidence Search Search sodium perborate and distilled water Search sodium perborate and 37% carbamide peroxide
Comments on
The Evidence
This was an RCT with similar groups at the start, >80% completion rate, groups were treated the same, had adequate followup, double blind, unlikely recall bias, and no competing interests.
Applicability Harms: Intracoronal bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide gel results in hydrogen peroxide diffusion into the periradicular area. 30%-35% Hydrogen peroxide has been linked to external resorption. The bleaching agent containing distilled water instead of carbamide peroxide is therefore potentially less damaging.
Specialty/Discipline (Endodontics) (General Dentistry)
Keywords Tooth bleaching; nonvital tooth; carbamide peroxide
ID# 758
Date of submission: 03/23/2011spacer
E-mail Fisherk3@livemail.uthscsa.edu
Author Katrina Fisher
Co-author(s)
Co-author(s) e-mail
Faculty mentor/Co-author Mark Littlestar, DDS
Faculty mentor/Co-author e-mail littlestarm@uthscsa.edu
Basic Science Rationale
(Mechanisms that may account for and/or explain the clinical question, i.e. is the answer to the clinical question consistent with basic biological, physical and/or behavioral science principles, laws and research?)
post a rationale
None available
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Comments on the CAT
(FOR PRACTICING DENTISTS' and/or FACULTY COMMENTS ON PUBLISHED CATs)
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by Saad Al-Otaibi & Saad Al-Mujel (Riyadh) on 06/25/2014
A PubMed and Trip database search on this topic in June 2014 showed that there are no recent articles on this specific topic and the articles listed are still valid and contains the highest level of evidence
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