ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM
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Title Over-the-counter Splints Used for Bruxism Have More Potential for Adverse Effects Than Splints Made and Adjusted by the Dentist
Clinical Question For patients with bruxism, are there risks of using over-the-counter splints as opposed to splints made and adjusted by the dentist?
Clinical Bottom Line For patients with bruxism, the use of over-the-counter splints have adverse events associated with them (e.g., unwanted occlusal changes, choking on the splint, tissue damage), additionally there are no published efficacy studies on any over-the-counter splint. For these reasons, it is recommended patients only use splints made and adjusted by the dentist.
Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link)
PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type
(level of evidence)
#1) 24923962Wassell/2014Editorial and Opinions
Key resultsThere are many types of over-the-counter splints and they are available through many sources, including the internet. There are many claims made for the various over-the-counter splints, but there are no published studies to support these claims. Over-the-counter splints have adverse events associated with them (e.g., unwanted occlusal changes, choking on the splint, tissue damage). Therefore, it is recommended patients, desiring to treat symptoms from nocturnal bruxism, only use splints made and adjusted by the dentist.
Evidence Search ("over"[All Fields] AND "counter"[All Fields]) OR "over the counter"[All Fields]) AND ("splints"[MeSH Terms] OR "splints"[All Fields])
Comments on
The Evidence
Validity: This expert opinion study, provided information from a search about over-the-counter splints that could be purchased online for treatment of nocturnal bruxism. The authors included a case report to support that over-the-counter splints which do not cover the entire arch can cause unwanted tooth movement. They state that all over-the-counter splints have the potential for not covering the entire arch and they provide studies that suggest these appliances have the potential of causing unwanted tooth movement in susceptible individuals who wear them for prolonged periods of time. Perspective: This is the only evidence, so far, available about this topic. This is an expert opinion study, which is weak evidence. No subjects participated in this study. Randomized clinical trials, cohort, or case-control studies need to be performed with this topic to provide better evidence.
Applicability Although one may question the validity of this evidence, it is currently recommended that patients, desiring to treat symptoms from nocturnal bruxism, only use splints made and adjusted by the dentist.
Specialty/Discipline (Oral Medicine/Pathology/Radiology) (General Dentistry) (Orthodontics) (Periodontics) (Prosthodontics) (Restorative Dentistry)
Keywords Splint, nightguard, occlusal orthotic, occlusal appliance, over-the-counter, tooth movement, over the counter
ID# 2735
Date of submission: 06/24/2014spacer
E-mail kakao86@msn.com
Author Mohamad K. Alhadlaq
Co-author(s) Abdulaziz A. Alblaihess, Shreya Ruxmohan
Co-author(s) e-mail a.alblaihess@hotmail.com, Ruxmohan@livemail.uthscsa.edu
Faculty mentor/Co-author Edward F. Wright, DDS, MS
Faculty mentor/Co-author e-mail WrightE2@uthscsa.edu
Basic Science Rationale
(Mechanisms that may account for and/or explain the clinical question, i.e. is the answer to the clinical question consistent with basic biological, physical and/or behavioral science principles, laws and research?)
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Comments on the CAT
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